TACTICS

81rnypfyldl

Copyright 2009

Gregory Koukl

I thought learning more biblical facts will help me to be better equipped to answer my critics — I was wrong.  Koukl provides believers will practical tactics to help defend and share our faith.  I have used some of his methods, and it has really helped so far.  It is an easy read but the tactics will take time to master.  It takes practice.  This book will benefit all Christians, but it is especially helpful for those who work and play around scholars and/or study among those in the science field.  Koukl provides a framework for argument, and most importantly, he flooded his book with practical examples.  A must read for students and young adults.  Read it and let me know what you think.

 

Brian (D.O.C.)

Prepared to Stand Alone

Image result for prepared to stand alone book

Imagine —  curling up on a cold wintry snow blizzard day, with a big cup of tea, in a warm place with a good book.  Usually that would conjure up images of a fiction book, but I recommend Iain H. Murray’s biography of J.C. Ryle. The tea and warm place may energize your body, but that fiction book will probably not be as edifying to your soul as “Prepared to Stand Alone” will be.

I am always intrigued and amazed at how God’s saints (biblical definition) stood firm in their faith in spite of the ‘fiery trials.’  The setting of this biography was set in England, during the 1800’s.  This is a different time from our day with different challenges, but I was still encouraged that time period and distance did not erase the common faith and challenges I share with those believers from the past.  There were two things from this book that resonated in my soul at this particular time in my life

(1) The common faith: “Who does not know that spiritual religion never brings a man the world’s praise?  It never has done, and never does.  It entails the world’s disapprobation, the world’s persecution, the world’s ridicule, the world’s sneers.  The world will let a man go to hell quietly, and never try to stop him.  The world will never let a man go to heaven quietly — they will do all they can to turn him back.  Who has not heard the nicknames in plenty bestowed on all who faithfully follow Christ? — Pietist, Methodist, saint, fanatic, enthusiast, righteous, overmuch, and many more…” p. 67.  This reminded me of Hebrews 12:1.

(2) My own inadequacy as an Elder: “However eloquent or apparently knowledgeable a preacher may be, there will be something seriously lacking the man who is not to be found in the homes of his people.  Sermons which only come from the study are not likely to be messages which bind speaker and hearers together in a common bond of affection and sympathy.  A preacher must be a visitor and be ready to preach everywhere.”  During the two years of his seclusion there he acquired, it can be stated, an entire pastoral knowledge of every man, woman, and child, under his charge.”

May God help us to bring glory to our Lord and Savior

 

Brian L. Spivey (D.O.C.)

One Purpose of Church Attendance

“Blessed is the one who reads aloud the words of this prophecy, and blessed are those who hear, and who keep what is written in it, for the time is near” Revelation 1:3

How many times have you read and heard sermons about this passage?  I have heard it many times.  I have also heard the phrase, “Context is King.”  Although I spent most of my adult life learning how to read and preach the Scriptures, I am reminded how easy it is to detach a verse from its original context. The principle, ‘Context is king,’ helped me understand a Bible passage this afternoon.

Have you ever wondered why it says, “the one who reads ALOUD the words of this prophecy”?  I haven’t until recently.  The context of this book is a letter that travels to seven different churches.  The one who reads aloud would naturally be the Elder or Pastor.  When John writes,  to the “angel,” he is referring to the pastor or elder.  Wow!  Now this makes so much sense.  The pastor would read it, and the congregation would listen and KEEP the words.  Those who do, will be blessed.  I guess this would be one of the main purposes of church attendance… not to get our ‘praise on.’  I didn’t think I would find it in The book of Revelation, but I am glad I did.

 

Brian L Spivey D.O.C.

A Sad Departure

asaddeparture-804x1280

181 pages, copyright 2001

In an age where things are not built to last; fixing something cost more money that buying a new one, and the average lifespan of newlyweds is three years, it seems more difficult to remain faithful. How difficult would it be to leave a local church? For many that would not be hard at all. And what about a denomination? That would probably be easier for many Americans. When ‘church’ is so easy to obtain with mega churches, online streaming and cell groups by Skype, remaining faithful to a denomination seems archaic at best. So it was a tough job for someone to write a book about how difficult it would be to leave a denomination and not vilify other Christians, but David J. Randall found a way. How could someone with a different background understand this? I was not raised in a denomination, I am not from Scotland, and so it is not my reality. But Randall was victorious. He captured the affective aspect of leaving a denomination that ia so woven in the fabric of that nation and families to the fourth and fifth generation. How do we hold strongly to our convictions and still behave in a way that honors Christ? Randall wrote the textbook. Read it. It will be time well spent.

Brian – D.O.C.

 

Love or Die – Christ’s Wake-up Call to the Church

41b9vxllbrl-_sy344_bo1204203200_

by Alexander Strauch

copyright 2008

Among the stack of books I “have”to read, this one was the easiest to understand but hardest to practice!  Strauch expounds on Revelation 2:4 and the church at Ephesus.  The order of his chapters were just as important as the content.  Chapter three of this book is entitled, “Teach Love.”  My eyes immediately went to that chapter, and I wanted to camp out there first, but I read the book in order and the chapter before it was “Pray for Love.” This was important and after incorporating this in my quiet time, it has really helped.  The chapter about teaching love was so difficult to rush through.  It was convicting on many levels, but especially the sentence that read, “Thus the Christian home should be characterized by Christ’s unselfish, giving love–a love that is initiated by the husband.”  The word ‘initiated’ was what caused me to pause and repent.  The other highlight of this book was his focus on the local church.  In the age of the so called, “virtual church,” Strauch helps church leaders and members consider how we learn how to biblically love one another when he writes, “If you are not a participating member of a local church, then you are not in God’s school of love.”  If you are brave enough to read this book, let me know what you think.

Brian Spivey — D.O.C.

A Memorial

Picture

I don’t think you meet too many great men in life, but I’ve had the privilege of knowing a couple. Eivion Williams had been a member of my church since 1983 and was a successful business man before coming to Christ. Once he became a Christian, he phased out his business interests so that he could serve the Lord in other ways. He ran the Schenectady City Mission for five years, then served a local Christian school, then was President of the Alpha Pregnancy Center for several years until he passed away last Sunday, April 17.

I learned a lot from him, mostly by example. He had great faith in God’s goodness, trusted God’s Word, and believed His promises. Eivion really had a heart to see sinner’s come to Christ, especially his friends and family. He also had a passion to save unborn babies from abortion and to help young mothers make the right decisions. He was a guy who prayed, then took action.

Clifton Park Community Church is going to miss him greatly. He was a faithful deacon, brother, and friend, as well as a godly father and husband. Even though he wasn’t saved until later in life, he was used by God to do great things in the church and in the community he served. Eivion was “all in”, and that’s primarily how I’ll remember him.

One can only wish to leave such a Christ-like legacy.

C.M. Granger

A Sermon Preached Without Words

I came across the story of this Christian couple who are country singers, Joey and Rory Feek, through my wife.  Joey was a new mother when diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2014, she recently passed away in March of this year.  The backstory is Joey was a huge fan and admirer of Dolly Parton, and a family friend had arranged for Dolly to give her a special message, slipped into the middle of a favorite movie, as she was in Hospice care at her childhood home in Alexandria, IN.

What struck me very deeply in the video of Joey’s joyful reaction is the way Rory, her husband, wept over her joy (although I’m sure those tears contained sorrow as well).

I can tell you the video clip embedded in this blog post preached to me like no sermon ever has.  It’s a living example of godly marital love, and I was deeply convicted of how far short I fall with regard to loving my wife as I should.  Since this is living theology, I thought it most appropriate for a theology blog.

C.M. Granger