Divine Duo

Did you ever see the Dynamic Duo – otherwise known as Batman & Robin? It first aired on T.V. from 1966-1968. Sometimes Batman would get captured and Robin would have to save him, but most of time, it was Batman that came to the rescue of Robin. This was done to emphasize the point – they worked best together. It just didn’t seem right if the two of them were not fighting along side each other. You can’t have one without the other and still have a Dynamic Duo.The apostle Paul also wanted to etch this theme in the minds of the Christians in Crete – you can’t have one without the other. The one difference between the Dynamic Duo and the Divine Duo is that Batman can be a superhero all by himself, but the two elements of the Divine Duo never operates separately.

In the last post I explored the first part of chapter one, verse one –“servant hood & apostleship.” The second part of verse one explores theme of the knowledge of the truth and godliness. This is the Divine Duo. This theme is one of the themes that help us understand the whole Book of Titus.

Christianity is not a religion of head knowledge only. The purpose of learning is to obey. Jesus said, “If you love me, you will obey what I command.” This helped the believers in Crete avoid false teachers; but this was written for our edification as well. When we are evaluating a Christian leader, the question is not just how much he knows, but how much he grows. Paul doesn’t only admonish us to examine our leaders, but to examine ourselves – does your biblical/theological knowledge match your biblical/theological maturity?

Brian L. Spivey D.O.C.

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J.C. Ryle’s Argument for Christianity

JC RYLE

“The religion of Christ must have been from heaven, or it never could have prospered and overspread the earth as it has done.  It is vain for infidels to attempt to answer this argument.  It cannot be answered.  A religion which did not flatter the rich, the great, and the learned,—-a religion which offered no license to the carnal inclinations of man’s heart,—-a religion whose first teachers were poor fishermen, without wealth, rank, or power,—-such a religion could never have turned the world upside down, if it had not been of God.  Look at the Roman emperors and the heathen priests with their splendid temples on the one side!  Look at a few unlearned working men with the Gospel on the other!  Were there ever two parties so unequally matched?  Yet the weak proved strong, and the strong proved weak.  Heathenism fell, and Christianity took its place.  Christianity must be of God.”

Expository Thoughts on Matthew 4:12-25, pg.30

 

C.M. Granger